Connect with us

Travel Guide

5 Steps to Safer Off-Grid Travel

Published

on

Steps to Safer Off-Grid TravelIn 2010, the New York Times ran a story about five neuroscientists who took a rafting trip in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in Utah. The intent of the trip was to understand how the heavy use of digital devices and electronic technology changes how we think and behave – and also how retreating from them can reverse the (often negative) effects.

This is is why everyone calls it a vacation – it’s a restorative break from our normal lives.

These days, there are many people interested in off-the-grid living for a wide range of reasons, both political and personal, and the travel industry has caught on. Once isolated to those willing to pitch a tent and fish for their dinner, off-grid travel has become increasingly popular with jungle retreats, luxury resorts, and even trailers that are dropped off at remote locations – just for you to enjoy.

How far you take your off-the-grid travel adventure can range from simply turning off your electronic devices and leaving the car parked in favor of riding bikes all the way to sleeping in a hammock on a sustainable farm, eating only what you help produce, and showering in collected water.

If the idea of being in some remote area and fending for yourself appeals to you, there is still the question of safety. The following are five steps to prepare to stay safe when you travel off the grid.

1. Know your limits

Even if the chaos of your daily life has driven you to want a digital break, it’s important to know your limits. If you cannot live without your news fix, but you can take a break from reading hundreds of emails and tweeting what you had for lunch, factor that in. Leave your laptop or tablet at home, get your news fix at breakfast from a good old-fashioned television station and you’ve made a change you can live with on vacation.

We found some recommendations for how to digitally detox weeks ahead of your vacation to ensure that you really can go (and stay) off the grid for that amount of time (apparently this is incredibly tough for some folks).

2. Pack the essentials

Loads of off grid travelers take themselves to very remote places – often far out of range of good medical care. Sure, you’ll probably spend most of your day hiking, swimming, or even working the fields if you’re contributing to a sustainable farm as your payment for a bed to sleep in, but it still makes sense to wear sunscreen, stay well hydrated with clean, safe drinking water, and eat well.

Perhaps you don’t mind suffering through a headache, but if you cut your finger some antibacterial and a bandage wouldn’t be a bad idea. Take a little time to think about where you’re going, pack a travel medical kit, and don’t let an insect bite ruin your health on this trip.

3. Get the necessary vaccinations

Many off-grid travel locations are in unlikely and remote places. Some of those places can expose a traveler to unwanted and unwelcome diseases that they’re not likely to get back home. Many diseases common in other countries have been virtually eliminated in the U.S. Depending on your vaccination records, you may need a booster or a vaccination you never needed prior.

Do a little research about your destination so you know what items to bring and what vaccinations to get ahead of time. See our traveler’s vaccination checklist for more details.

4. Have an emergency plan

This is the one most travelers – even those not going off grid – forget and it’s unfortunate because some pre-trip planning can make all the difference. Anytime you’re traveling, it’s a good idea to let someone know where you’ll be and when you’re expected back. After all, if you don’t show up, help can be sent.

If you’re leaving behind all electronics, find out if where you’re going has a landline, a radio, or some way to get in touch in an emergency. Hint: even a whitewater rafting guide has to check in sometimes. If they don’t, consider the option of taking along a charged cell phone and turn it off unless you have an emergency.

5. Have travel insurance

Travel insurance is even more important when you’re traveling to a remote location where there are few medical facilities. If you are badly injured or become severely ill, you’ll need a travel insurance plan with coverage to take you to safety. Ensure that your travel insurance plan will cover your emergency medical treatment costs as well as your medical evacuation costs before you take your off-grid trip.

A final word about off-grid travel …

Some travelers find it very easy to get into the new no-digital routine, but while you’re traveling off the grid, it’s important to remember some basic safety rules too:

  • Let someone know when you’re going hiking, swimming, etc. Even better, take a buddy along with you.

  • Don’t touch the weird looking things. In remote places, you’re likely to encounter plants, insects, fruits, and more that you’ve never seen before. Unless you know what it is, don’t touch it.

  • Respect the neighbors you do have. Some remote eco-resorts, for instance, are also populated with wild animals, snakes, rodents and more. The best way to stay safe is to respect their space.

See also our 7 Essential Travel Products for Of-the-Grid Trips for a few more ideas when you’re planning your next trip.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Travel Guide

Brian Altomare on Shark Tank lessons, reducing covid-19 risk by minimizing time at the airport, and making your bed (Safe Travels #24)

Published

on

By

Today I’m speaking with Brian Altomare from Lugless.com.

Even though most travel is still shut down, some parts of the country are starting to move around again.

I was curious about getting some advice for those who were still concerned about coronavirus, but who needed to fly whether for work or other necessary reason.

What could they do to minimize exposure and get through the flying process with as little concern as possible?

Today’s show is a little different, because there is definitely a product pitch…but it’s a service that can help minimize your time in the airport and make your trip more worry-free.

I’m speaking with Brian Altomare who founded a luggage shipping service called LugLess.

Brian pitched this on Shark Tank years ago, and even though that didn’t go the way he wanted…he still grew the company and thrived…and it was later acquired.

Brian will talk about how this service minimizes your airport time and therefore your exposure to coronavirus.

He’ll talk about his Shark Tank experience.

Then in a departure from the norm for Safe Travels, he offers some entrepreneurial advice for those who might have an idea they want to run with.

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes & Timestamps

  • Lessons learned from the Shark Tank pitch 00:03:11
  • How LugLess helps reduce exposure at the airport 00:04:19
  • Who benefits most from LugLess? 00:10:14
  • Key success tips for entrepreneurs starting out 00:13:43
  • Avoiding startup mistakes 00:15:22
  • Work/life balance 00:16:35
  • The magic of making your bed…every day 00:18:3

Listen

Listen on Spotify

Continue Reading

Travel Guide

Jeff Crider on campground procedures during coronavirus, beginner tips, and the “marriage saving RV parking service” (Safe Travels #23)

Published

on

By

In this episode we are talking about RV travel for the summer of 2020, and how to handle coronavirus concerns.

I’m joined by Jeff Crider, who is a publisher and author for several RV and campground-related publications, and has been in the business for decades.

Jeff is especially tuned into campgrounds and their specific procedures for handling coronavirus concerns this summer. He will share some of the actions campgrounds are taking, tips for smooth travels this summer, and some common mistakes that new RVers make and how you can avoid them.

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes & Timestamps

  • Current status of campgrounds with covid-19 00:03:53
  • On the need for extra homework in researching trips this year 00:04:47
  • Resources for campground status 00:06:12
  • Why tent campers might have a harder time 00:09:14
  • RV travel as a safe “social distancing” form of travel 00:13:05
  • General tips for new RVers 00:21:18
  • Tips on backing and asking for help 00:23:34
  • Common mistakes and how to avoid them 00:25:16
  • On renting vs buying 00:31:14

Listen

Listen on Spotify

Continue Reading

Travel Guide

Leslie Stroud on coronavirus lockdown in New Zealand, full-time travel with 5 kids, and “roadschooling” (Safe Travels #22)

Published

on

By

In this episode I speak with Leslie Stroud of 7Wayfinders.com.

She and her family (5 kids!) were traveling the world full-time when coronavirus came along and brought their plans to a halt….in New Zealand.

Leslie talks about the very strict and thorough safety lockdown in New Zealand, handling this with kids, and plans to get out when things open up again.

She also shares family travel tips, advice for road-schooling, and more.

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes & Timestamps

  • On the overwhelming decision to travel full time as a family 00:06:41
  • Coronavirus lockdown in New Zealand 00:10:10
  • The thorough safety measure in NZ 00:11:48
  • Tips for full-time travel with a family 00:18:57
  • Mistakes to avoid when traveling with kids 00:22:25
  • Misconceptions of traveling with kids 00:24:43
  • Advice for “Road-schooling” 00:27:18

Listen

Listen on Spotify

Continue Reading

Trending